MAGNOLIA BAYOU Releases Official Music Video for Cover of Eddie James “Son” House Blues Hall of Fame Inducted “Preachin Blues'”

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Mississippi based, Southern Blues / Rock Band MAGNOLIA BAYOU has released the official music video for their rock infused cover of the BLUES HALL OF FAME inducted, EDDIE JAMES “SON” HOUSE classic “Preachin’ Blues.” The fourth single off of the band’s upcoming, sophomore album, STRANGE PLACE, “Preachin’ Blues” was shot and edited by AUTUMN LEITH (WICKED & WONDER) & JOHN REYES (JOHN REYES NETWORKS).

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Click to Download / Stream “Preachin’ Blues” Online

Album Artwork

Track List: 1. Dig Deep 2. Sleepin’ In The Dog House 3. Sugarspell 4. Preachin’ Blues 5. Hands In The Dirt 6. From The Other Side 7. The Robber 8. Hurricane 9. Tupelo 10. Sweet Magnolia 11. Thieves

Click to Pre-Order “Strange Place” Online

Band Live Photo

Forged in the heart of a Mississippi swamp, Magnolia Bayou’s sound is appropriately reminiscent of the golden age of Rock N Roll, and it is simultaneously flavored with a heavy, southern swagger that is distinctively theirs. Their bluesy aura can be traced back to the groups origins, where they submerged and steeped themselves in their home state’s profound, musical wealth; covering the likes of Robert JohnsonSonny Boy Williamson IIHowlin’ WolfJohn Lee HookerSon House and so many more. Like their musical forefathers, the band spent three years blazing their way through juke joints along the Mississippi Blues trail, before independently recording their debut album in 2018. After it’s release, they spent the next two years extensively touring the surrounding south, traveling as far as the midwest and the pacific north east. In that time, they’ve supported many acts such as Whiskey MyersWet WillieRay Wylie HubbardFantastic NegritoTyler ChildersIan MooreAaron LewisBishop Gunn & Black Stone Cherry.

In May of 2019, Magnolia Bayou set out to record their follow up album, Strange Place, at Natchez Sound Studio with Bishop Gunn’s very own Burne Sharp at the helm. “The album draws inspiration from such artists as Son House, Black SabbathSoundgarden, and the Black Crowes, and it’s apparent that the Bayou Boys are drawing from a deep and eclectic musical swamp.” -Tom Scarborough. The album is slated for release on September 24th, 2020.

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Rosco Bandana Releases “Feels Like Mississippi” Free Single Download

Click Here To Download Free “Feels Like Mississippi” Track

“Feels Like Mississippi” Lyrics:

Verse:
Back roads and old cane poles
All we got is our beautiful souls
Shinin’ like the Gulf of Mexico
We hold our heads up high ya see
As a beacon for hospitality
Our difference is our greatest strength

Chorus:
And we’ve come through the darkest hour
We found love was our greatest power
And Mississippi pride is what drove us on
It feels like comin’ home

Verse:
From Tylertown to Tupelo
You’re gonna find some folks who know
Catfish and cotton ain’t all we grow
If they say the southland is all the same
That we’re all still runnin a backwards game
Just take a little trip to a place with an old name

In 2000, former Mississippi state Senator Billy Hewes introduced a bill calling for a competition to find a new state song to replace Mississippi’s official song “Go Mississippi” (adopted by state legislature in 1962). He renewed his push for a new song in a November interview with the Clarion Ledger.

“We’ve got world−recognized talent. Get Faith Hill, B.B. King, Rosco Bandana − heck, get 3 Doors Down or Super Chikan − we can come up with something better,” said Hewes.

Since then, in a continued effort to change the state song Senator Robert L. Jackson has introduced two additional state song bills, one proposing to change the state song entirely and the other proposing to adopt a second state song.

Rosco Bandana heeded the call. The band was speeding between dates on I-10, but when they heard their home state of Mississippi needed their help they pulled over to a rest area and wrote the song on the spot at the side of the road and sent an iPhone recording of it to their label.

Upon returning to their hometown of Gulfport, MS after the December tour, the band took time over the holidays to record what they hope to be the new rallying cry of the state they proudly call home.

“Mississippi means so much to the band,” singer/guitarist Jason Sanford said. “We hope to bring a little bit of Mississippi to every town we play in, no matter where we are. And that’s why this opportunity means so much.”

Rosco Bandana Is Beginning It With Real Swagger

The rockabilly resurgence, alt-country movement has been exploding in the American music atmosphere over the past decade… to the point that American rock n’ roll feels like it is has truly revolted against the British Invasion and reestablished itself as the source, rather than recipient, of influence that inspired that cultural surge (for example, Muddy Waters’s blues being the root of Led Zepplin’s rock). This has been somewhat obvious in the main-aside-of-the-mainstream stages played by Wilco, the Jayhawks, Bright Eyes, and the Avett Brothers, and a bit less obvious, but just as beautifully, by bands like Old Crow Medicine Show, the lesser-known Notorious String Dusters, and the meteoric Punch Brothers.

Into this glorious era of country rock comes a solid offering from authentically souled and uniquely qualified Rosco Bandana, who are bringing it all with Southern and vintage style on “Time To Begin,” released by Hard Rock Records in September 2012. Thing is, listening to Rosco Bandana gives the very legitimate impression that they’ve been doing this steadily and are now emerging up and out, rather than landing on the scene.

A strong initial impression is young Dylan-esque vocals strongly rolling along on many tracks, but the mild, gravel-tremolo quality of lead singer and song helmsman, Jason Sanford, neither dominates nor diffuses the clear strengths of the ensemble in terms of vocals or instrumentation. Ballads and rambling rock are the mainstay on Time To Begin, however there is a variety of action that moves between twangy old-country/near-Gospel and hard-hitting beer-bar bouncers (like a bumpy tour bus, swerving back and forth across US-Route 90, Beach Boulevard through Rosco Bandana’s hometown of Gulfport, Mississippi). The album actually has the feel of a road trip and gives a well-mixed swath of strengths from the instruments that reveals a diverse mix of influences. Tracks like #2 “Woe Is Me” range from a toe-tapping akin to the Soggy Bottom Boys on the soundtrack of the Coen Brothers’ “Oh Brother Where Art Thou” to a screaming wail that inspires as much jump as quintessential Lynyrd Skynyrd, while a number of tracks have real moments of full-Jerry Lee Lewis-blooded piano from keyboard provider Emily Sholes tinkling on top.

Both in instrumentally inventive and lyrical terms, listen out for some of everything you’d hit on a road trip from FLA to LA – with, obviously, major pit stops in the heart ‘Bama, Mississippi, and Texas. See if you don’t catch a mellowed ZZ-Top vibe off of track #8, “El Luna,” when lapsteel player Jason Weldon backs-up an Eliminator classic car in your drive way. Also be ready for frequent bursts of Merle Haggard and the Hank Williamses throughout and taken to the maximum on Track #9 “Tangled Up,” which brings a super satisfying, funky beat that is reminiscent of Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen.

Associations aside, Rosco Bandana is belting big sounds out with their seven-person set that don’t belong to anyone but themselves. The band’s bio reads like a 21st Century American music parallel to the 20th Century American astronaut story The Right Stuff – not a band of misfits, but a well-fit band of differences. The blending of the female and male vocal ranges offers a 3D version of the traditional screening of the spectrum of music into which Rosco Bandana might be best categorized, and the Southern identifiers of the music come across as a “best of” of that respective soundscape minus any of the hangups or languor that stereotypically get lumped in with the word “South” in Northern ears. But, don’t take my word for it, if folk rock/alt-country is your genre in the least, get Time To Begin and take the road trip yourself.

“Time To Begin” by Rosco Bandana is out there on Hard Rock Records and the American highway.