COIN @ The Club at Stage AE Sunday, February 19th

image004Featured on TIME’s “21 Musicians We Want to Hear From in 2017”

 

Included in Nashville Lifestyles’ “Ones to Watch in 2017”

 

“…a prime example of just how sweet indie alt-pop can sound when it’s done right.” – Entertainment Weekly

 

COIN’s infectious single “Talk Too Much” continues to hold in the Top 10 on Alternative Radio. The band teamed up with Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump to create a remix of their Alt Nation hit, which premiered on Alternative Press. Watch “Talk Too Much” official video HERE.

 

COIN—Chase Lawrence (vocals/keys), Joe Memmel (guitar/vocals), Ryan Winnen (drums) and Zach Dyke (bass)— recorded their self-titled debut album in Nashville with Grammy nominated producer Jay Joyce (Cage the Elephant, Sleeper Agent), which was released in the summer of last year. COIN has toured non-stop with acts such as The 1975, Bad Suns, Walk The Moon, Passion Pit, Young The Giant, and Neon Trees. The band is set to release their sophomore full-length album this spring.

For more information, please visit thisiscoin.com.

 

NK: “Heavy-Ass Hip Hop with a Side of Patton”

Alarm Magazine describes their song “Shoulder Gorilla” as, “Heavy-ass hip hop with a side of Patton?” and then goes on to say, “As music lovers, we await those rare projects that combine familiar and new elements in unique, indescribable ways. Comprised of singer/guitarist Ryan Hunter (Envy on the Coast), bassist Michael Sadis (The Rivalry), and drummer Billy Rymer (The Dillinger Escape Plan), NK is one of those projects…. a mash of Deftones-style groove riffs, heavy hip hop, shoegaze, post-punk, and soulful down-tempo jams, topped by Hunter’s alternate croons and half-raps. On “Shoulder Gorilla,” he channels his inner Mike Patton — specifically, Patton’s collaboration with The X-Ecutioners — as dirty synths and dirtier guitars bang heads across the land. And this all comes courtesy of one of the least-boring “lyric videos” that we’ve ever seen.”

NK recently hit Pittsburgh’s Stage AE opening for Fall Out Boy and put on a spectacular performance… (All photos ©2013 JasonHann Photo and Pittsburgh Music Magazine)

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Nothing To Be Gained Here takes the listener through the multiple personalities of the band, creating a powerful trip for the listener. The album’s peaks and valleys are strung together by the monstrous and soulful rhythm section, comprised of Michael Sadis on bass and Billy Rymer on drums (Dillinger Escape Plan), as well as Ryan Hunter’s (Envy on the Coast) visceral and uninhibited lyrics and vocal style. On “Confessional”, “Shoulder Gorilla”, “Kings” and “Set a Fire”, the band shows their affinity for heavy music, with Rymer giving the listener a bit of his signature drumming style he’s become known for, but also embracing a more open, deeper style of playing we haven’t heard on his prior work. Abrasive guitars and fuzzed out bass tones match Rymer’s style of playing, while Hunter’s vocal style is a fusion of rhythmic aggression and a unique approach to melody. On “Vacation Days” and “Memo”, the band turns down the gain and embraces a warmer, down-tempo, soulful side. With Mike Sapone (Brand New, Taking Back Sunday, O’ Brother) and Hunter taking on production duties, Nothing To Be Gained Here, is an extremely rhythmic, lyrically dense, and dynamic debut full length.

 

Pre-orders for the album have launched on the Triple Crown website. The LP will also be available in 3 limited edition vinyl color ways (orange, blue and clear) starting in mid-June.

 

To pre-order: http://www.merchdirect.com/TripleCrownRecords/NK/?artistid=2596.


NK will play a hometown record release show on 6/15 at Revolution Bar & Music Hall in Amityville, NY with Shone, A Great Big Pile Of Leaves & Happy Body Slow Brain. Tickets for the show can be purchased through the band (http://www.merchdirect.com/NK/Tickets/OlliesPointTicketPosterBundle/?productid=16920) or the venue (http://www.ticketweb.com/t3/sale/SaleEventDetail;jsessionid=qAnD66x2VdUzSpdbUDJqew**.node10?dispatch=loadSelectionData&eventId=3527934).

 

NK will be announcing additional tour dates shortly.

 

View the Nothing To Be Gained Here album teaser here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5D2qCbS1VVo.

NK (Featuring Members of Envy On The Coast, Dillinger Escape Plan) To Support Fall Out Boy on Spring Tour From 5/21-5/26

NK (Featuring Members of Envy On The Coast, Dillinger Escape Plan) To Support Fall Out Boy on Spring Tour From 5/21-5/26

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Check out Band’s Lyric Video For “Shoulder Gorilla”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHkKfbEDXks

 

Nothing To Be Gained Here LP on May 21 Via Triple Crown Records

 

Album Produced By Mike Sapone (Brand New, Taking Back Sunday, O’ Brother)

 

Pre-Orders Now Available

 

 

Long Island, NY’s NK (featuring members of  Envy On The Coast, Dillinger Escape Plan) will be supporting Fall Out Boy on their spring tour from 5/21-5/26. See dates below.

 

5/21 Pittsburgh, PA     The Stage AE

 

5/22 Detroit, MI          The Fillmore

 

5/24 Toronto, ON        Sound Academy

 

5/25 Montreal, OC     Metroplois

 

5/26  Boston, MA        House Of Blues

 

 

The band recently posted a lyric video for the song “Shoulder Gorilla”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHkKfbEDXks

 

The track appears on NK’s debut LP, Nothing To Be Gained Here, out May 21 via Triple Crown Records.

 

Alarm Magazine describes the song as, “Heavy-ass hip hop with a side of Patton?” and then goes on to say, “As music lovers, we await those rare projects that combine familiar and new elements in unique, indescribable ways. Comprised of singer/guitarist Ryan Hunter (Envy on the Coast), bassist Michael Sadis (The Rivalry), and drummer Billy Rymer (The Dillinger Escape Plan), NK is one of those projects…. a mash of Deftones-style groove riffs, heavy hip hop, shoegaze, post-punk, and soulful down-tempo jams, topped by Hunter’s alternate croons and half-raps. On “Shoulder Gorilla,” he channels his inner Mike Patton — specifically, Patton’s collaboration with The X-Ecutioners — as dirty synths and dirtier guitars bang heads across the land. And this all comes courtesy of one of the least-boring “lyric videos” that we’ve ever seen.”

 

Nothing To Be Gained Here takes the listener through the multiple personalities of the band, creating a powerful trip for the listener. The album’s peaks and valleys are strung together by the monstrous and soulful rhythm section, comprised of Michael Sadis on bass and Billy Rymer on drums (Dillinger Escape Plan), as well as Ryan Hunter’s (Envy on the Coast) visceral and uninhibited lyrics and vocal style. On “Confessional”, “Shoulder Gorilla”, “Kings” and “Set a Fire”, the band shows their affinity for heavy music, with Rymer giving the listener a bit of his signature drumming style he’s become known for, but also embracing a more open, deeper style of playing we haven’t heard on his prior work. Abrasive guitars and fuzzed out bass tones match Rymer’s style of playing, while Hunter’s vocal style is a fusion of rhythmic aggression and a unique approach to melody. On “Vacation Days” and “Memo”, the band turns down the gain and embraces a warmer, down-tempo, soulful side. With Mike Sapone (Brand New, Taking Back Sunday, O’ Brother) and Hunter taking on production duties, Nothing To Be Gained Here, is an extremely rhythmic, lyrically dense, and dynamic debut full length.

 

Pre-orders for the album have launched on the Triple Crown website. The LP will also be available in 3 limited edition vinyl color ways (orange, blue and clear) starting in mid-June.

 

To pre-order: http://www.merchdirect.com/TripleCrownRecords/NK/?artistid=2596.

image003 (1)


NK will play a hometown record release show on 6/15 at Revolution Bar & Music Hall in Amityville, NY with Shone, A Great Big Pile Of Leaves & Happy Body Slow Brain. Tickets for the show can be purchased through the band (http://www.merchdirect.com/NK/Tickets/OlliesPointTicketPosterBundle/?productid=16920) or the venue (http://www.ticketweb.com/t3/sale/SaleEventDetail;jsessionid=qAnD66x2VdUzSpdbUDJqew**.node10?dispatch=loadSelectionData&eventId=3527934).

 

NK will be announcing additional tour dates shortly.

 

View the Nothing To Be Gained Here album teaser here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5D2qCbS1VVo.

 

 

www.facebook.com/officialNKmusic

 

www.triplecrownrecords.com

Patrick Stump Posts Lengthy Blog On Hate Culture

Patrick Stump of Fall Out Boy has posted a rather lengthy blog on the culture of hate that we breed and live in today (copied from http://propertyofzack.com).

How many people reading this are fans of Nickelback? How about Dane Cook? Now, I can safely assume that, unless this blog gets reposted on a site dedicated to those respective artists, those questions would be met with tumbleweeds and the distant sound of crickets. Like Creed or Limp Bizkit or the “Dude! You’re getting a Dell!” kid, they’ve become ubiquitously hate-able. I would not be exaggerating to state I’ve simply never heard someone admit to liking them.

Why is that? Now, I’m not saying I like them. Like you (fellow pop culture spectator) I am honor-bound by the unspoken law that, no matter what, I am not allowed to say anything positive about these artists. What have they really done wrong? Have they offended me? Not really. I’ve been more offended by Michael Richards famous rant or Sean Connery’s statements about hitting women. I still watch Seinfeld and James Bond movies. Hell, the misogynistic subtext of James Bond movies offend more of my sensibilities than anything Nickelback ever did and yet I don’t have any problem escaping to a world of fast cars and women with offensively suggestive names (Pussy Galore? Like…are we not even trying?) Somewhere in the world at this moment, some snooty contrarian is probably defending the paintings of Adolph Hitler. Yet for some reason, here I am crippled by a vague and probably unwarranted desire not to appear to be a fan of Nickelback and Dane Cook.

That’s sad. In this generation of blazing wi-fi and scathing tweets, I think it’s very easy to lose sight of anyone else’s opinion. We’re so busy broadcasting our latest cultural disdain that we scantly notice anything we enjoy. “Oh man, this Rebecca Black kid is terrible! Let’s laugh at her!” has become more culturally relevant than “I really love this new Bilal record.” I read an entire article examining why we as a society don’t like Anne Hathaway’s (in my un-necessary opinion, lovely) face. Well, criticizing art and the artists that make it is a lazier pass time than creating or appreciating it.

I’m not saying professional critics aren’t good at what they do. On the contrary; Some of my favorite writers are and have been. The problem is that now everyone has a blog. Everyone’s a critic. Hell, I have a blog. That I’m writing on right now. I have movie reviews posted on here somewhere. What gives me the right? The late Lester Bangs knew what he was talking about. Roger Ebert has written enough scripts to know when somebody sucked at writing one. They earned their stripes as have countless current critics (too many to list here and I think to name names would be a conflict of interest). These people are artists in their own right.

I’m an artist. Not necessarily a good one (and certainly not as a critic), but I consider myself one nonetheless. I look at the music I create as art. I work hard to craft it. When I perform, I make as many sacrifices as I find reasonable in order to perform to the best of my abilities. It affects the way I eat, the way I sleep, the frequency with which I can drink, the medications I take, the nightclubs I can go to (namely: None); I have to take my entire life a little more seriously if I’m going to not sound like the Cave of Wonders from Alladin. I study other musicians. I’m always working to improve my abilities as a songwriter or a guitarist or a producer or a programmer or a lyricist, etc. I’m sure Nickelback, at least somewhere in they’re career, are or were no different. They worked (and potentially still are working) to be the best damned Nickelback they can be. All of the agreed upon pariahs throughout pop-culture history put their identities into the thing we decry.

And yet we derive our own identities from the act of hating. We connect on the things we are disappointed in. Some may argue that nothing in history gathers a crowd like complaining about Lady Gaga’s meat dress. Near-masturbatory complaining has brought together more people than cheap liquor. “Who hates the government?” “Cheeer!!!!” “Don’t you just hate Justin Bieber?” “Huzaaaaah!”

What is it about pop culture though? We don’t have the same reactions to, arguably, more personal tastes/decisions such as food. We actually physically put food into our bodies. We are literally made of the things we eat. We don’t go into a grocery store and go “Ew! Hey, look at barbecue sauce! Don’t you just friggin’ hate barbecue sauce?” No. Because clearly tons of people love barbecue sauce and if we don’t like it, we will quietly opt out of eating it. There’s not instant value judgement in removing yourself from the crowd of barbecue sauce lovers. There’s also not a decided alternative to barbecue sauce because, hell, the whole damn grocery store is an alternative to barbecue sauce. If anything, in regards to pop culture, we don’t just go out of our way to avoid the things we don’t like; If it’s the grocery store we more or less put on our coats, brush the snow off our cars, drive across town, find a parking space, run into the aisle, and stand in front of the product going “Haaaa! Fuck this thing!”  All I can guess is this must simply be more entertaining than wasting time actually ENJOYING something.

You see it all the time in the music community. We partition ourselves off into little sub-groups. From those sub-groups, even littler still. When I was a kid I loved a Chicago hardcore band called Los Crudos. They’re reuniting and I’m excited about that. However, I would be (based on my career path) designated as either a pop-punk, emo, or outright pop-singer and therefor I feel a slight tinge of worry at my admission that I love Crudos. Part of me thinks “Wow, anyone who’s heard of that band almost certainly hates mine and will almost certainly hate me and want to disassociate themselves from me,”. I can’t watch the HBO show Girls (which I love) without thinking to myself “Oh man, these characters and maybe even some of these actors would probably be too ashamed to be caught dead even knowing someone who still owns a Fall Out Boy shirt.”

Because we define ourselves by hate. It’s an obvious insecurity we can’t see in ourselves. I can’t tell you how many times I (either as part of Fall Out Boy or as a solo artist) have asked another artist to tour together or work together on a song and been shot down on the grounds of “Oh you guys are lame.” I can’t tell you how many times I (either as part of Fall Out Boy or as a solo artist) have probably unwittingly done the same exact thing to another artist. That’s strange. A simple “No,” would have sufficed. But for some reason, we as human beings have to stamp it into the ground and shout it from the rooftops; “Let it be known that I wouldn’t be caught DEAD in a St. Anger t-shirt…just in case you were wondering. And Twilight SUCKS!…probably.”

Now, I’m not saying everyone needs to go around playing nice and never admitting that they dislike things. That’d be ridiculous. But perhaps we as a culture have exhausted (at least for a little while) whatever can positively be gained by ignorantly dismissing things as loudly as we can. I started off talking about Nickelback. I really couldn’t tell you one of their songs. What qualifies me to say I dislike them? Dane Cook? He was actually pretty rad on that Louis C.K. show. Maybe next time I’m at the proverbial pop culture grocery store and someone offers me the proverbial barbecue sauce, I’ll politely decline and head to another aisle to purchase something I enjoy.

Fall Out Boy Returns to Pittsburgh (5/21) and Everywhere Else in 2013

Fall Out Boy hit iTunes today with a new single, “My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light ‘Em Up),” and their fifth full-length album, Save Rock And Roll, is due out on May 7. In their hometown Chicago on Monday night at Subterranean, FOB will be gearing up by playing their first show followed by another in New York on Tuesday at Webster Hall Studio and a third in Los Angeles on Thursday at the Roxy. Here are the scheduled dates (so far) for the rest of the tour…

The Save Rock And Roll tour dates:
» 5/14 — Chicago, IL @ Riviera Theatre
» 5/16 — Milwaukee, WI @ Rave
» 5/17 — Columbus, OH @ LC Pavilion
» 5/21 — Pittsburgh, PA @ Stage AE
» 5/22 — Detroit, MI @ The Fillmore
» 5/24 — Toronto, ON @ Sound Academy
» 5/25 — Montreal, QC @ Metropolis
» 5/26 — Boston, MA @ HOB
» 5/28 — Niagara Falls, NY @ The Rapid Theatre
» 5/29 — New York, NY @ Terminal 5
» 5/30 — Philadelphia, PA @ Electric Factory
» 5/31 — Washington, DC @ 9:30 Club
» 6/1 — Charlotte, NC @ Fillmore
» 6/2 — Atlanta, GA @ Tabernacle
» 6/4 — Orlando, FL @ HOB
» 6/5 — Miami, FL @ Fillmore
» 6/7 — Houston, TX @ Bayou Music Center
» 6/8 — Dallas, TX @ Palladium
» 6/9 — Austin, TX @ Stubb’s
» 6/11 — Phoenix, AZ @ Marquee
» 6/13 — Los Angeles, CA @ Wiltern
» 6/15 — Las Vegas, NV @ HOB
» 6/16 — San Francisco, CA @ Fox Theater
» 6/18 — Portland, OR @ Roseland
» 6/19 — Seattle, WA @ Sodo
» 6/20 — Vancouver, BC @ Commodore Ballroom
» 6/22 — Salt Lake City, UT @ In the Venue
» 6/23 — Denver, CO @ Ogden
» 6/25 — Kansas City, MO @ Uptown Theatre
» 6/26 — Minneapolis, MN @ Myth
» 6/28 — St. Louis, MO @ The Pageant
» 6/29 — Indianapolis, IN @ Egyptian Room
» 6/20 — Nashville, TN @ Ryman Auditorium