Slaves on Dope’s Jason Rockman & Kevin Jardine Present a cover of Public Enemy’s She Watch Channel Zero

100% of Proceeds to Benefit ROADIE RELIEF!

Montreal, Québec – Slaves on Dope’s Jason Rockman and Kevin Jardine, along with Bill Kelliher of Mastodon, are back with their project The Kings of Quarantine, this time with a powerful rendition of Public Enemy’s “She Watch Channel Zero.” The new video features musicians Billy Gould & Mike Bordin (Faith No More), Mix Master Mike (Beastie Boys), SA (311), MC Serch (3rd Bass), Derrick Green (Sepultura), Sen Dog (Cypress Hill), Toby Morse (H2O) and a special appearance from legendary pop-artist Ron English (Popaganda)!

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The Kings of Quarantine came together in 2020 after a discussion between Jason and Bill about possibly collaborating on a cover song. “She Watch Channel Zero” is the third installment in a series of covers that will be released throughout 2021 in an effort to bring some joy and entertainment to music lovers worldwide. “We hope to not only put a smile on people’s faces, but also help the touring staff that have been severely affected by the pandemic”, says Jason Rockman. One hundred percent of the profits will be donated to Roadie Relief, a fundraising effort to aid qualifying Roadies who have submitted an application for financial help.

The Kings of Quarantine have no plans of slowing down, with more star-studded covers to be released in the near future!

Click to Download “She Watch Channel Zero” and Support ROADIE RELIEF on BANDCAMP

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Click to Download “Mountain Song” and Support ROADIE RELIEF on BANDCAMP

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Click to Download “We Care A Lot” and Support ROADIE RELIEF on BANDCAMP

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Almost everyone you know has seen a concert that has moved them. Those productions can take over 100+ traveling crew members to set up by the time doors open.

Before and during the show they sweat and hustle to get everything ready. After the show they spend more hours erasing evidence that they were ever there at all. Many of these key players work an average of 20 hour days, then move on to the next city to make it happen all over again.

Many of these crew members, “roadies,” have been doing this as a career for decades. Some of these roadies, while experts in this field, have never had any other job experience. Since the world pandemic, well over a hundred thousand of these people are left with no income and no financial assistance.

There are no concerts or live events for the foreseeable future. At the beginning of 2020, job opportunity ceased to exist and 2021 remains uncertain. Many are unable to claim unemployment as their expert level trade skills are not recognized and they do not qualify. This on-going problem is leaving 100s of roadies without a secure livelihood.

The government has fallen short. Contacting congressmen and women, senators, and governors to raise the issue has been met with no resolution. Their replies are a formal brush-off and roadies are left hitting a dead end.

The goal with this gofundme is to offer some relief to some of the dedicated people in the roadie community. Just like you, they have families, mortgages, car payments, and day care. Commonly these workers lean on their savings between tour cycles, but those funds have run thin or run out. Please donate if you can, every little helps.

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Rock Legends Donate Invaluable Fan Memorabilia to Support ROADIE RELIEF!

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With the continued stall on mass gatherings putting tours and festivals on hold, a massive and irreplaceable part of the music industry has been and continues to be horrifically impacted: touring support and live event crews. Founded by CHAD WARDROADIE RELIEF is working to bring the industry together to provide ongoing support to live event workers and so has organized, with 32auctions.com, to launch unique, music focused auctions! Their second auction, live now through April 14th, includes incredible donations from members of some of the biggest names in rock and metal, including KISSFOO FIGHTERSKORNGHOSTBON JOVIFAITH NO MORE, and many more.

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Faith no More bundle #3

Auction Donations Include but Not Limited To:

1.Tommy Thayer (Kiss) personally signed signature series Epiphone Les Paul.
2.Phil X (Bon Jovi) signed Gibson Les Paul Jr.
3.Taylor Hawkins (Foo Fighters) piano black Gretsch Drum kit he used at Wembley Stadium in 2008 with All Access laminate from the show. 4.Papa Emeritus IV (GHOST) signed Hagstrom Phantom guitar.
4.A 30 min one on one Zoom with PNUT of 311.
5.5 different Faith No More bundles that have signed poster, guitar pics and after show pass.
6.Brad Wilk (Rage Against The Machine) signed cymbal (used at last Rage show).
7.2 – 311 band signed posters.
8.Queen +Adman Lambert signed show poster from their last show plus a pair of Roger Taylor’s drum sticks.
9.Ray Luzier (Korn) signed snare drum (his signature series custom hard shell snare case also signed by him).
10.Metallica bundle including show poster, pair of Lars Ulrich’s used drum Sticks, and one of Lars’s custom snare drum Heads
11.Live performance photographs from shows including:

Lemmy (Motörhead)
Ozzy Osbourne
Keith Flint (Prodigy)
Axl Rose of (Guns N Roses)
Cardinal Copia (Ghost)
Tom Petty

1.311 signed skate deck.
2.Artist Thomas Estrada donated custom art commission to winning bidder.
3.Steve Stevens (Billy Idol) signed custom guitar pedal + guitar pics.
4.Avenge Sevenfold signed record.
5.Several concert collectors posters: Pearl JamSoundgarden (and more to come).
6.Darkglass Electronics 500 v1 bass amp
7.Aric Improta (Fever 333) custom art work drum head signed by him
8.Ray Luzier (Korn) signed drum head and pair of sticks
9.Foo Fighters Bundle – Taylor sticks, Dave Grohls sweat band and guitar pic and 2 all access laminates.
10.Custom hand made guitar used on episodes of Couch Riffs.

Click to View Full Auction and Bid on Items

Click to Donate Directly to ROADIE RELIEF

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KISS’s Tommy Thayer Les Paul – signed to winner

“Before I became the lead guitarist for KISS almost 20 years ago, I worked behind the scenes with Kiss on and off the road. I have a unique perspective and appreciation for how hard our crew works day in and day out. I’ve been there.” – TOMMY THAYER (KISS)

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Ray Luzier of Korn signed snare and custom case

“Everyone knows that the musician community has suffered. When we get done with a tour, I know that our crew is getting ready to head out on another tour, already. They spend 10-11 months on the road, this is their and their families’ livelihoods. I know these families are hurting. I had donated some drumsticks and other items in the past, but decided that, this time, I wanted it to be something special and selected a unique hardshell snare case created by Michael Berg of Humes & Berg and a snare drum that I used on The David Lee Roth Band 2004 tour. Hopefully, this helps the crews and gets the fans inspired to help build our industry back up.” – RAY LUZIER (KORN)

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“I’ve been a touring musician for over twenty eight years and roadies have made it possibly at every step of my career. Roadies are free spirits who solve a myriad of problems daily while out on the road. I donated cause I love talking to awesome people and I thought it could motivate our audience to dig deep and help our industry get back on its feet.” – PNUT (311)

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Taylor Hawkins Drum kit / laminate Foo Fighters
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Ghost Hagstrom Phantom signed by Papa Emeritus IV
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Signed Aric Improta drum head of Fever 333
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Phil X of Bon Jovi signed Les Paul Jr guitar
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Almost everyone you know has seen a concert that has moved them. Those productions can take over 100+ traveling crew members to set up by the time doors open.

Before and during the show they sweat and hustle to get everything ready. After the show they spend more hours erasing evidence that they were ever there at all. Many of these key players work an average of 20 hour days, then move on to the next city to make it happen all over again.

Many of these crew members, “roadies,” have been doing this as a career for decades. Some of these roadies, while experts in this field, have never had any other job experience. Since the world pandemic, well over a hundred thousand of these people are left with no income and no financial assistance.

There are no concerts or live events for the foreseeable future. At the beginning of 2020, job opportunity ceased to exist and 2021 remains uncertain. Many are unable to claim unemployment as their expert level trade skills are not recognized and they do not qualify. This on-going problem is leaving 100s of roadies without a secure livelihood.

The government has fallen short. Contacting congressmen and women, senators, and governors to raise the issue has been met with no resolution. Their replies are a formal brush-off and roadies are left hitting a dead end.

The goal with this gofundme is to offer some relief to some of the dedicated people in the roadie community. Just like you, they have families, mortgages, car payments, and day care. Commonly these workers lean on their savings between tour cycles, but those funds have run thin or run out. Please donate if you can, every little helps.

SHARE | INSTAGRAM

Faith No More Share Video of Full 1986 I-Beam Performance

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 25, 2016 – Faith No More, who released We Care A Lot (Deluxe Band Edition) on Friday, share video of the band’s full 1986 I-Beam performance: https://youtu.be/7_7kwmBmoW8.

Audio from two of the songs performed that January 13 evening, “The Jungle” and “New Beginnings,” are included on the reissue. The original 10-song album, which has been re-mastered by Maor Appelbaum via the original reels Bill Gould unearthed in his basement, is enhanced with nine bonus tracks including demo versions (taken from the original 8-track tapes) of “Greed,” “Mark Bowen,” “Arabian Disco” and “Intro,” live versions of “The Jungle” and “New Beginnings” and new mixes, via Matt Wallace, of “We Care A Lot,” “Pills for Breakfast” and “As The Worm Turns.” Liner notes from keyboard player Roddy Bottum and behind-the-scenes photos will be included with the physical release. We Care A Lot (Deluxe Band Edition) is available now on CD/vinyl (http://faithnomore.kungfustore.com), and digital (http://geni.us/WeCareALotDigital).

It’s been a busy week for the San Francisco-based band, with Gould, Mike Bordin, Roddy Bottum and Jon Hudson surprising fans at Chuck Mosley’s San Francisco and Los Angeles shows for a set featuring music from the seminal album.  Photos can be seen here, courtesy of L.A. Record:http://larecord.com/photos/2016/08/22/chuck-mosley-and-friends-the-troubadour.

Original flyer from the 1986 I-Beam show
We Care A Lot originally arrived in November 1985 via Maximum RocknRoll editor Ruth Schwartz’s Mordam Records. The seminal album, boasting the timeless title track, which can still be heard daily on radio stations worldwide, confounded music fans and critics alike. As Pitchfork said in a 2015 article dubbed “The Misunderstanding of Faith No More,” the unpredictable and hard-to-define band “had radically altered the parameters of popular music years before the fabled alternative revolution.” Rolling Stone called it a “raw punk album” while Select Magazine dubbed it “a lustful marriage of mutoid metal and dance floor verve.”

“When strangers ask what Faith No More is I’ve always said, ‘well, it’s kind of an art band…’ I say that mostly to distance us from the hard rock world that we’re often times lumped into. I mean, hard rock, sure, that was part of it, but our roots most definitely and pointedly stem from a specific freakout art time and place in San Francisco, a time that no longer exists. In 1982, the hippies mingled with the punks, the artists hung out with the musicians, the dance people and the punks were one and the Satanists and the sexual pioneers… all part of the same scene,” Bottum explains, colorfully setting the scene for the original inspiration for the band and We Care A Lot. “That weird SF window provided a platform from which we were free to express and cultivate a really uniquely odd sound experience. In Los Angeles, no one really cared much, but SF was always super supportive, encouraging us, directly and not, to get our collective freak on.”

“We felt like it was time to take the next step,” adds drummer Mike Bordin. “We raised as much money as we were able and booked time at Prairie Sun Studios just north of San Francisco. I can’t remember how long it took us to record the album, but not a lot, maybe a few days. The songs were sharp from having played most of them at various shows.  Very stripped down, basic as could be.  The place was on a farm in chicken country (Petaluma). Hard work, but a ton of fun too.”

We Care A Lot (Deluxe Band Edition) track list:

1. We Care A Lot
2. The Jungle
3. Mark Bowen
4. Jim
5. Why Do You Bother
6. Greed
7. Pills for Breakfast
8. As The Worm Turns
9. Arabian Disco
10. New Beginnings
11. We Care A Lot – 2016 Mix
12. Pills for Breakfast – 2016 Mix
13. As The Worm Turns – 2016 Mix
14. Greed – Original Demo
15. Mark Bowen – Original Demo
16. Arabian Disco – Original Demo
17. Intro – Original Demo
18. The Jungle – I-Beam, SF, 1986
19. New Beginnings – I-Beam, SF, 1986

12 Foot Ninja: The Band You Need To Fear

Not a week, if not day, goes by that I am not asked, “Hey man, any cool new bands on the scene?”.  Of course there are so many depending on your likes and tastes.  As an owner/editor of a music magblog I get tons of requests daily to check out new stuff and to promote things and I truly like a lot of it since I am a music addict.  But, the ones that I find most special are the artists that come my way from my friends who are not promo-ing someone, just sharing their love for music with another.  One of those bands that came my ears’ way was through a good friend who happens to be friends with the guys in Periphery who recommended 12 Foot Ninja from Australia.

From the first time you hear them, or hear about them, you will get direct comparisons to Mike Patton and Faith No More…and that is a great thing and a great compliment.  The diverse styles of music that 12 Ft. Ninjas throw into their music is insane and fit into places that don’t seem like they would make sense, but somehow absolutely make sense.  The update on what Faith No More did is readily apparent, taking the technology of today and their musical prowess into the new age of music.

They have recently hit The States with a smattering of support dates and were very recently on Sirius XM speaking to Jose Mangin while they were in New York (and even stayed at his house).  I’m going to go out on a very secure limb here and say that these guys are going to be very big here.  All they need is the a few good support tours and the right promotion and they will be HUGE.  Check them out here…

http://twelvefootninja.com/

Fan Q & A with JIM MARTIN, Formerly of FAITH NO MORE

After a silence of over a decade, Jim Martin agreed to a Q&A session with fans via a British based fan site. A set of 15 questions were selected by administrators of the fan site from over 500 submissions by fans eager to hear from Jim.

What follows is a Q&A session with Jim Martin, former Faith No More guitar player, songwriter, and producer, and fans of Faith No More.

“Some weeks ago, the FNM “fan club guy” was asking about how to contact me, he wanted to talk to me about the fan page.. After several exchanges via email, he and I decided to do a Q&A thing for the fans. My departure from FNM in 1993 was controversial; I left while the band was still at the peak of its success. I am proud of my contributions to the success and legacy of FNM. I appreciate the time and effort it took to put these questions together. Thank you for the opportunity”, states Jim Martin.

1. Nefertiti Malaty

Q: What do you consider the highlight of your career?

A: Performing with Bo Diddly, Klaus Mein, Metallica, Gary Rossington, Pepper Keenan Sean Kinney Jerry Cantrell John Popper Jason Newstead, singing Misfits songs with Metallica live during our tour with them and GNR.

2. Eric Land
Q: You are an influence to many younger guitarists today, but who were your biggest influences and what do you remember about how those people helped to craft your sound and play style?

A: My influences to a greater extent were Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix, and David Gilmore. Mostly Page. His method of using a pick and his fingers at the same time and his way of squeezing the humanity out of a guitar. It’s funny how influences work. My influences were influenced by old blues men. Those legendary blues men were influenced by their tribal ancestors. The tribal ancestors are the link back to the beginning; they are the keepers of the essence. Through my influences I am connected to the roots of time and the music that elevates the primordial spirit of mankind. We do not truly compose anything genuinely new, the listeners and the presentation are what is new, and it is the perspective that varies. The ability of expression and improvisation, the stuff of creation that fascinates all life.

3. Grant
Q: It was great seeing you play again during the Metallica event…also some very great words spoken about Cliff….it was great to see ya!
Weird question, Big Jim…and I only just thought of it while scrolling through the last post on FNM Blog: What was the deal with you being the only clothed FNM member in the infamous “FNM underwear poster”? Did you just think the photo idea was dumb, or did you think it’d be better/funnier with one dude dressed to the nines in jeans, leather vest, etc. while everyone else was near nekkid.

Thanks for doing this Q&A, man! Excited to see the responses!

A: I remember it was one of the first big photo shoots for us set up by London Records. Ross Halfin, “Famous Rock Photographer”, was pretty aggressive, barking orders and abusing band members, particularly Puffy. He ordered everyone to strip down. I said “forget it” (I thought it was dumb). The other guys did, he snapped the picture and at that moment, I understood why he was famous…

4. Anonymous
Q: I’m a crazy obsessed fan and have listened to just about all the bootlegs and read all the interviews…Despite “not being into” the music on Angel Dust (so it is written in places), you played flawlessly all of 92-93 and I even caught you banging your head enthusiastically during the Phoenix Festival. Also, while others were bad-mouthing you, you always played it off with a joke and came off as the bigger person (you were hilarious in the Maida Vale interviews!)…somethiing doesn’t add up. Were you really that unhappy? If so, how do you keep such a cool head and stay so professional?

A: Thank you for the great compliment.
My publicized “not being into” Angel Dust was all about the way the whole process went down. There was a lot of weird pressure to follow up The Real Thing, and as a consequence, the album AD was more contrived musically than I thought was necessary. I wanted more of the record to happen in the studio and Bill wanted every last tack nailed down before we went in. I wanted to spend time with it, management and the record company wanted to rush it out the door. There were a bunch of journalists in the studio. We were paying for a bunch of sampling that we could have created. Matt Wallace was calling me on the phone complaining about Mike Patton’s performance. Management and record company were calling me complaining about Mike Patton’s performance and desire for outside projects.
The record company president came in the studio and said: “I hope nobody bought houses” All the air got sucked out of the room. That was one of those great moments when reality slaps you in the face. Some of my associates (had) bought houses. The pressure was on, and everyone wanted to be in the studio with me while I recorded, endlessly tinkering and fucking with me and fucking with Matt, and Matt is a really fucking wound up guy already. Prior to AD, I would work alone with Matt and his assistant engineer period. I had to kick everyone out and even though it was not a new concept it really pissed everyone off.
Live performances were always very strong. From my perspective, we came across a lot heavier than the records. Over time, the chord progressions and the arrangements would morph in subtle ways that would make the set heavier than the studio version. As far as the bullshit in the press, yeah, there was a lot of negativity, and I tried to avoid being part of it to the point of refusing interviews. Of course I was unhappy; individuals were making decisions which would prove to be damaging to FNM. However, despite these distractions, real people paid to see a show and we were able to deliver thanks to the support of a great crew and a great sound man, Greg Bess, who was used to working with the heavy bands. I actually really enjoyed those shows.

5. Anonymous
Q: If you could collaborate for a single cover song with any musician, dead or alive, who would that be and what would the song be?

A: I sure miss Cliff. Cliff Burton. We could do any song and twist it up horribly. I think if there were an opportunity to collaborate, we would write something new. Put Dave (Donato – Agents of Misfortune) in there on the drum kit and create something Cliff’s mother would call “Fucked Up Weirdos”.

6. Matt Slavsky
A: I’ll get this one out…what is your relationship like now with the members of Faith No more?

Q: To be honest Matt, that is an emotional subject. There has been much negative rhetoric in the press, and it was my choice to either play their game, fight with them and let the press spin it, or leave them to play with themselves and allow you to make a decision based on the work I left behind. In an effort to avoid the negativity, I chose the latter. However, there are some points that I would like to address.

I read a couple of interviews Matt Wallace did, and his simplified explanations can lead one to believe that I hate homosexuals, I did not contribute to Angel Dust, and I did not play guitar on the record. Ouch. Something else is a little more accurate. The guitar parts are mine; that’s me playing guitar on all the tracks. I contributed much to the songwriting and arrangements. Bill added some fluff to “Midlife Crisis” and “Midnite Cowboy” and wrote everything for his song “Small Victory”, Mike wrote everything for “Malpractice”, I wrote everything and created the samples for “Jizzlobber” ; Bill contributed the keyboard outro. Mike wrote all of the lyrics for the album except Roddy wrote lyrics for “Be Aggressive”.

Matt’s commentary about Roddy seemed a little weird; we (band members) all knew Roddy was gay long before he “came out” and it was not an issue for anyone.

Matt also forgot to mention that he and I spent a lot of time together on the production of TRT and AD improving the recording method and sonic profile in the studio. I insisted on the co-producer credit for FNM on those 2 records because of that work. Notice The Real Thing and Angel Dust are the only two FNM records co-produced by Matt Wallace and Faith No More.

I saw something in Wiki where someone pulled a comment out of an old bucket: Jim Martin said “I don’t know why It’s called Angel Dust, I had nothing to do with it” While that is true, it is not complete. The idea was Roddy’s, and nobody else had anything to do with it either. He came in with a basic concept of a bird front, meat locker back, and Angel Dust for the title. The question was: “How do we get it (Roddy’s idea) to the record cover?” We lost control of the sleeve art on the last 2 releases. The Real Thing and Introduce Yourself were conceived and designed by “the record company” and we simply paid the bill. This was an opportunity of artistic expression and finally one of us had an idea everyone would go along with. I got in contact with Mark Leialoha to discuss the idea, he got Werner “Vern” Krutein involved because Werner ran a stock agency and was able to produce the necessary photographs allowing us to realize Roddy’s idea. I had the idea of the Russian army in the sleeve, inspired by The Pogues album “Rum Sodomy and The Lash” which I was really into at the time. I rode hard on that and made sure it happened the way WE wanted it to happen. There was a lot of squealing when it came time to pay the bill, but at the end of the day, we retained control of our resources, we were able to use our people, and we maintained creative control.

7. Matt Thompson
Q: Jim! With your publicized dislike of the content/direction of Angel Dust – are you surprised by how, 20 years on, it is widely regarded as one of the most influential ‘metal’ albums of the past 30 years?

A: Thanks for the opportunity Matt.

As for my like or dislike of AD I touched on that a little, so please refer to question 4 above.

I am happy AD is regarded in a positive way. It is an affirmation of the legacy we all worked to create. I am aware that some of the newer bands I actually like have referred to FNM as an influence. I am also aware AD was on the Kerrang! Most influential albums List of 2003. Is it an artist’s affirmation? That’s fine. Am I surprised? I don’t think anyone can be expected to anticipate something like this.

8. Otto Will Hashmi
Q: What kind of music are you listening to today? Is there anything that we might not generally expect that you like to listen to?

A: I’ve been listening to Machine Head, a great metal band out of Oakland CA. I enjoy classic jazz, reminds me of weird times as a kid. I like the “Glorious lethal euphoria” of The Mermen It’s crazy hardcore psychedelic surf music and hits the mark hard. I’ll listen to any improv, at least for a few minutes.

9. Follow The Bubbles
Q: Is it true that you were offered to perform at reunion tour dates – if it is true why did you decline? Fans would have been so happy to see on stage too!

A: Thanks Bubbles.

For some time during 2008, I had been receiving information with increasing frequency that “we” were booking a reunion tour, festivals, Europe. I was informed that yes, the promoters were selling it as the original line up. In February 2009, Roddy called and said they were just beginning to think of putting something together, and just now feeling out everyone, and what did I think? I said yes, I was interested. I also told him I knew the tour was already booked, they were on the eve of announcing it, and it was time to sign the deals. I told him to send over the contracts so I could review them and started pressing management for details. Several days later, I was able to get management on the phone who told me they decided to use someone else…I know it’s odd, no, you didn’t miss anything. It happened just like that. In an effort to preclude any sloppy misinformation, I made the announcement that I would not be participating in the rumored reunion dates several days before they made their announcement.

10. Sean Kehoe
Q: If Faith No More tours again and if they asked would you make an appearance, kind of like when Chuck did a couple of songs? Would love to watch you perform songs like Malpractice or Jizzlobber would be awesome!

A: Thanks Sean. I know the fans want the real thing, and I was prepared to have a real dialogue about doing a run together. Unfortunately, it didn’t happen. As for a random appearance, I do not feel that would do anyone justice.

11. Jon Hanusa
Q: If you could use Bill and Ted’s phone booth to go back in time to the Angel Dust era, would you do anything differently to make sure you and FNM were heading in the same direction? If so, what?

A: Number one thing: limit journalist access and impose more control over the interviews. Almost anyone could get an interview at that time. It was a free for all, and it hurt us.

12. David Barajas
Q: Have you been jamming with anyone lately, and do you have any plans to make more music?
A: No, I’m not working with anyone right now but I do have plans to publish more music. I released a record some time ago called “Milk and Blood” go to rotgrub.com and email the webmaster for details.

13.Andrew Dunn
Q: What do you think of the music FNM have created post you? And how do you feel when you see other guitarists belting out you licks?
A: I remember hearing some of the music a long time ago but I didn’t really study it. I remember thinking it was heavily reliant on Mike. As for other persons playing my music, I don’t really believe anyone could book a show as FNM without playing my music.

14. Bob Anderson
Q: Being one of the best shredders of your era/generation, and having rubbed shoulders with some awesome musicians in your time, have you never considered forming your own little “supergroup” to set the music word to rights!!??
A: Most of my associates have families and projects taking up their time, and I’m very consumed with the things I am doing. I hope I can get to a place where I’ll be able to do something pretty soon. There are no specific plans at this time. Thanks for a great compliment.

15. Mark Rayburn
Q: Hey Jim, thanks a bunch for doin this. So where did you get the moniker “big sick ugly” from and did you like it??
A: It was bestowed upon me by the filthy press. I am pretty sure Geoff Barton gets the credit. Steffan “Cheese Burger” Chirazi, “Krusher Joule” and Neil “Greasy Chester” Perry helped magnify and perpetuate it and it was Kerrang!, once again, who rolled that one out there. Thanks to them for some funny times.