BLOODYWOOD COMBATS LOSS WITH CANINE THEMED MUSIC VIDEO, “YAAD”.

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New Delhi based Indian Metal Band BLOODYWOOD has released the official music video for their newest single, “Yaad.” Shot in between the snow-capped mountains of the Himalayas and urban India, the music video celebrates the universal human experience of love and loss through a moving story between a man and his companion dog.

“’Yaad’ (Hindi for ‘remember’ or ‘in memory’) is about the power of accepting the loss of a loved one and moving on. The lyrics celebrate the permanent impact they have on us, reiterating the belief that we carry them in our best memories, no matter how far apart we may be, says Karan Katiyar, Bloodywood’s Founder/guitarist, “I lost my dog 10 years ago and I still feel the loss to this day. I wanted the video to show the bond between a man and his dog to highlight its message.”

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Download / Stream “Yaad” Online:

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In spirit of the message within the song and video, Bloodywood funded the purchase of an animal ambulance for a local non-profit animal shelter called The Posh Foundation, who had to recently scrap their existing ambulance due to overuse and break-downs and were in dire need of a new one.

Old Van:

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New Van:

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The new ambulance, which will help save the lives of over 27,000 homeless animals in the National Capital Region of India over the next 5 years, was purchased by the band using the profits made on their very successful 2019 debut tour of Europe named Raj Against the Machine Tour and through their crowdfunding page on Patreon.

Bloodywood were scheduled to make their US debut at the Sonic Temple Festival which has been cancelled due to the CoronaVirus. Karan adds, “We had the US tour planned and we have dates in Europe in August, We are very sad we didn’t get to play for our American fans, and hope our August European festival dates don’t get cancelled. No matter what happens in 2020 we will be back in 2021”

The European Festival Dates:
07/08 @ Bloodstock Festival – Derby, UK
08/09 @ Alcatraz Festival (Swamp Stage) – Kortrijk, BE
08/14 @ Reload Festival – Sulingen, DE
08/15 @ Summer Breeze Open Air – Dinkelsbühl, DE

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Bloodywood is a metal band from India known for pioneering a sound that seamlessly fuses Indian folk instruments with metal to devastating effect. Expect to hear the percussive power of the mighty Dhol, the melancholic flute, the single stringed Tumbi and several other uncommon, yet distinctly characteristic sounds from India. A combination of thunderous Hindi/Punjabi choruses and meaningful yet unforgiving rap verses along with the ethnic instrumentation makes Bloodywood a truly unique experience.

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Silverstein @Mr. Smalls on 3/1

After spending the summer sweating it out on Warped Tour and their fall trekking through the UK and Europe, Canadian post-hardcore outfit Silverstein are showing no signs of running out of steam, embarking on The Get Free Tour in the new year, with support from Tonight Alive and Broadside.

Silverstein released their eighth full-length album Dead Reflection in July to critical acclaim. Check out their track “Ghost” here, which premiered on Sirius XM Faction.

“The element of hope has always been in our band; we want to preach positivity, it’s just that sometimes you have to go through darkness to get there. At the core, that’s what Dead Reflection is about,” said vocalist Shane Told, who also hosts the wildly popular Lead Singer Syndrome podcast.

The Get Free Tour stops at Mr. Smalls in Pittsburgh, PA on 3/1.

Longevity is a rare feat for any band, especially one rooted in a foundation of punk and hardcore. Aggressive music is often fueled by youthful fire, and sustaining a career without completely abandoning that urgent sound is almost impossible for most bands. But what’s possible for “most bands” has never been a concern for post-hardcore pioneers Silverstein. Throughout the course of their 17-year career, from Ontario basement shows to touring the world and selling over a million records, Silverstein has always managed to be completely comfortable in their own skin while never being afraid to challenge themselves. This perfect balance marks the band’s eighth full-length, Dead Reflection—an album that proves Silverstein still has plenty of fire left.

Silverstein have released an album every odd year since their 2003 debut, When Broken Is Easily Fixed, and that drive is paramount to why the band remains one of post-hardcore’s most relevant and influential acts. This consistency shows an uncommonly clear path of growth from album to album as the band honed the aggressive-to-melodic contrast that became their signature sound. Dead Reflection marks a sharp jump in that evolution: the band pushed themselves harder than ever before, resulting in an album the takes all of Silverstein’s strengths—pummeling riffs, explosive dynamic shifts, and huge, anthemic choruses—and ramps up the intensity. Guitarist Paul Marc Rousseau co-produced Dead Reflection with Derek Hoffman, leading to a level of collaboration with which band had never experimented before. After years of creating and touring, the members of Silverstein have each become accomplished musicians in their own right while still summoning the same unbridled ferocity that marked the band’s early days, and it’s this fusion that makes Dead Reflection feel so vital.

Vocalist Shane Told has always been a master of taking his darkest times and channeling them into compelling songwriting, and Dead Reflection ups the ante as the singer documents his most troubled year. The tumultuous end of a long relationship sent Told into a self-destructive spiral that left him isolated and forced to confront who he truly was with everything stripped away. All of the positivity that had previously come so easily suddenly felt put-on, like a costume that never quite fit, and as the people closest to him were all entering new phases of life with new responsibilities, the singer found himself feeling more alone and nihilistic than ever. In the end it was Silverstein, the one constant in Told’s life, that brought him back from the brink. With the prospect of writing a new album on the horizon, he thew himself into the process, fully exploring the bleak narrative he was living out. Dead Reflection became a sort of “What-if?” version of Told’s life, a cautionary tale urging listeners to find out what really matters and challenge their own masks before it’s too late. Writing proved to be as cathartic as it was harrowing, and slowly Told began to feel the weight of the past year lifting; Silverstein had been there for him just when he needed it most.

Dead Reflection is an album that couldn’t exist without everything that’s come before it, a culmination not just of Silverstein’s sonic growth, but also the personal journeys entangled in the band’s career. Longevity was never the objective, but that drive to deliver their absolute best, no matter what the cost, is exactly why the band remains at the top of their game after almost two decades. For Silverstein there is no settling, no stopping, and they give nothing less than everything.